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Neurotic Political Junkie.

Politics, geekiness, anxiety. Sometimes life posts sneak in.
Feb 17 '12

People rightly flipped out across the internet last month over news that the Swedish parliament would not be repealing a barbaric law that forces sterilization on trans people seeking to  change their gender on legal documents. While it’s despicable that  Swedish politicians are opposing the law change, much of the outrage, no  doubt, occurred because people previously didn’t realize that a forced  sterilization law existed in Sweden. 
Considering how shocking people find Sweden’s law, it’s worth  pointing out the country is 1 of 17 in Europe (shown in red) that  require trans people to have a surgical procedure that results in  sterilization before legal gender change is made to their identification  ID. The law is currently under review in Denmark, the Netherlands, and  Portugal, and in Ireland a name change (which acknowledged gender  change) was granted for one woman after a legal challenge that went to  the high courts, but no laws exist on the matter.

More at Mother Jones.

People rightly flipped out across the internet last month over news that the Swedish parliament would not be repealing a barbaric law that forces sterilization on trans people seeking to change their gender on legal documents. While it’s despicable that Swedish politicians are opposing the law change, much of the outrage, no doubt, occurred because people previously didn’t realize that a forced sterilization law existed in Sweden. 

Considering how shocking people find Sweden’s law, it’s worth pointing out the country is 1 of 17 in Europe (shown in red) that require trans people to have a surgical procedure that results in sterilization before legal gender change is made to their identification ID. The law is currently under review in Denmark, the Netherlands, and Portugal, and in Ireland a name change (which acknowledged gender change) was granted for one woman after a legal challenge that went to the high courts, but no laws exist on the matter.

More at Mother Jones.